The hijab is not an obligatory Islamic religious practise, according to the Karnataka government.

Article 25 of the Indian Constitution, which guarantees religious freedom, was not violated by prohibiting the practise of Islam or prohibiting its usage.According to Advocate General Prabhuling Navadgi, the government has decided that wearing the hijab is not an obligatory Islamic practise.

The hijab is not an obligatory Islamic religious practise, according to the Karnataka government.

“My initial submission is that the order is in accordance with the Education Act,” said Navadgi. The second point is that the hijab is a necessary component. We have taken the position that wearing the headscarf is not an important Islamic religious practise. The right to wear the hijab can be traced back to Article 19 (1). (a). It does not do so, according to submission.

The hijab is not an obligatory Islamic religious practise, according to the Karnataka government.

The Attorney General also dismissed the claim of certain Muslim females who claimed that the Karnataka government’s February 5 decision prohibiting pupils from wearing hijab or saffron scarves violated Article 25 of the Constitution.The Advocate General also claimed that the state government’s directive of February 5 was legal and that there was nothing to object to.Last week, the High Court issued an interim ruling prohibiting all students from wearing saffron shawls, scarves, hijab, or any religious apparel in the classroom, pending the resolution of all petitions relating to the hijab debate.

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